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“Life is too short to start drinking the wrong coffee.”

Latte Art Gallery

Latte art is a method of preparing coffee created by pouring microfoam into a shot of espresso and resulting in a pattern or design on the surface of the latte. It can also be created or embellished by simply “drawing” in the top layer of foam.

Barista Coffee

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COFFEE AROUND THE WORLD

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BREWING METHODS

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BARISTA COFFEE

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ESPRESSO

ESPRESSO

For the purists. A single shot of delicious freshly ground espresso coffee… and nothing else.
LATTE

LATTE

The milky one. Espresso coffee, topped with plenty of steamed milk and a head of silky smooth foam.
CAPPUCCINO

CAPPUCCINO

Espresso coffee, a dense foam cap and plenty of steamed milk. Topped with a sprinkling of chocolate.
AMERICANO

AMERICANO

A double shot of espresso coffee topped with hot water. An energy boosting coffee without the milk.
FLAT WHITE

FLAT WHITE

A shot of espresso coffee, complemented by velvety smooth steamed milk without the froth.
MOCHA

MOCHA

Espresso combined with chocolate and steamed milk. Sprinkled with cocoa powder.

COFFEES AROUND THE WORLD

Affogato (Italy)

The Affogato is a classic Italian preparation pairing espresso and gelato. In Italian, “affogato” means drowned, a reference to the fact that the espresso is poured over a scoop of gelato, drowning it.

Türk Kahvesi (Turkey)

The boiling process employed in Turkish coffee leaves a thick froth on the surface which is a hallmark of the style. Cream or milk are never added and the coffee is never stirred so as not to disturb the foam.

Ca Phe Trung (Vietnam)

It is typically made from egg yolks, sugar, condensed milk and robusta coffee. Some tasters have described it as essentially a “Cadbury Creme Egg with a hint of mocha”.

Cafezinho (Brazil)

Compared with a regular drip coffee, cafezinho is extremely thick and strong. It is even more concentrated than espresso and is served super sweet without any milk or cream. Its unique characteristics come from the use of a special cloth flannel filter for brewing.

Qahwa (Saudi Arabia)

Qahwa is simply the arabic word for “coffee”, but it is served in a unique fashion in Saudi Arabia. Though the brewing method is similar to Turkish coffee, they use green coffee beans and make a very weak brew. Along with cardamom, a few other seasonings are regularly added including saffron, rose water, cinnamon and cloves.

Cafe de Olla (Mexico)

Cafe de Olla translates as “Pot Coffee” a name which comes from the fact that it is brewed in a clay pot. It is a comforting beverage most often found in rural areas with cold climates. The distinct flavor of the drink comes from cinnamon and piloncillo, a traditional Mexican sugar. Other potential additives include clove, allspice, black peppercorns, and orange peel. Rarely is it served with any milk or cream.

BREWING METHODS

ESPRESSO MACHINE

Anyone who knows anything about coffee knows what an espresso machine is – they’ve been keeping us caffeinated since 1901. Today they come in various shapes and sizes, with loads of features and gimmicks. Don’t get confused by flash machines though because the basics are the same: pressurized water is pushed through a chamber/puck of finely ground coffee beans, through a filter, resulting in what we call a shot of espresso.

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STOVETOP ESPRESSO MAKER AKA MOKA POT

The magic behind the Moka pot is in its 3 chambered brew process. Water in the bottom chamber boils, and the steam causes pressure that pushes water up through the coffee grounds into the top chamber. Is the resulting shot the same as an espresso shot? Depending on who you ask – not quite.  If you do it right (there is a little skill involved) you’re left with a bittersweet & super-strong concoction that will get you through the day. Heres a guide on brewing moka pot coffee. One bonus to the Moka pot: you can brew multiple cups of coffee (from four to 16) at once. It’s a great way to caffeinate a crowd.

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FRENCH PRESS

The French press is the unofficial mascot of home brewed coffee; it’s been steeping coffee in households since before your grandparents were born, and it has a very loyal, cult following among the home barista community. Why so? ​It’s likely thanks to multiple reasons, but our money is on the fact that its super easy to use, can be picked up for pocket change (almost) and produces a brew with a distinct taste and feel like no other method. If you’re into the French Press use the right coffee grind as this little known but super common mistake taints French Press coffee all over the world.

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THE CHEMEX INFUSION METHOD

The Chemex brews coffee using the infusion method, which makes it most similar to drip coffee in terms of body and taste. Chemex filters are 20-30% thicker than those used by other pourover methods such as the Hario. The result is a slower brew and a richer cup of coffee. Although not as rich as the French Press, the Chemex does produce a sediment free cup of coffee that will impress anyone used to the weaker taste of most auto-drip coffee machines.

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CEZVE

From 1299 The ottoman empire ruled Turkey for an impressively long stint, and strong Turkish coffee played a significant role in fueling their endurance. There’s a very good chance that I made up that last fact, however, you can be sure that (a) Turkish coffee packs a punch, and (b) It’s been enjoyed around the world for a very long time. Brewing Turkish Coffee seems easy, but with like most brew methods, there’s skill in doing it right. The most common way involves a Turkish coffee pot, water and very finely ground coffee beans. You’ll simmer the brew a number of times (2-3 times) and end up with a brew that you’ll love or hate: strong but exceptionally tasting with a thick foam on top.

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